South Asia » India

Harnessing Kolkata metropolitan explosion
  Kolkata urban town planning Metropolitan Strategic Plan
  India Challenge
India is expecting 360 million people to move from rural to urban in the next 20 years. That is 50.000 every day. Thus the need to build 12.000 homes every single day for the next 20 years. Is India providing adequate land every day to accommodate these needs?

Growth rates of Indian Metropolises range from 11% annual to 7% or 5%, the lowest Mumbai 3 %. 11% growth means doubling every 7 years. Pune, such is the case, has to twofold every 7 years. A challenge Government is not being able to handle. Mumbai, with its 3 % growth rate, requires to double every 23 years: a task beyond Government’s capacity.

This challenge affects more than 50 metropolises in India beyond a million inhabitants. The 164 million inhabitants of these cities will become 400 million in 20 years. Building New Towns (or ‘Smart Cities’) cannot respond to those daily 50.000 figures. Actual problems have to be addressed in actual cities instead of running away into non-performing promises. A real solution is required as social inequity and social unrest is not an acceptable outcome. Inability to do so will affect India for many decades (even centuries) to come.

Two examples: New Delhi and Kolkata
Among the six largest Indian Metropolises we are going to focus in Delhi and Kolkata.
How to cope with growth figures? How to address the issue? How to allocate uses? Where to provide land? How to build infrastructures?
In both cases of New Delhi and Kolkata we can analyze and determine the metropolitan structure providing for the correct location of urban expansion, natural protection, infrastructure provision and productive allocation.

- New Delhi has a four-corner-post very strong structure that can be developed to manage and provide for growth. This structure can be developed into precise urban scale implementable projects proposals. All of them within a consistent, most needed, development pattern.
- Kolkata is more linear due to the river strong impact and wetlands difficulties. Reinforcing the efficient linearity and opening up transversal potentials within an existing mass transit system might be the strongest solution.

This approach can be developed for other metropolitan explosive areas in India. It’s up to Government to show its leadership capacity.
Building New Towns (or ‘Smart Cities’) cannot respond to those daily 50.000 figures. Actual problems have to be addressed in actual cities instead of running away into non-performing promises.
 
Mumbai Metropolitan Management Strategy
  Mumbai Metropolitan Plan regional strategic priorities Metro Matrix Mental Map
  This 5-points analysis is followed by a consecutive 4-point proposal development. Prioritization leads to immediate action to address Mumbai urgent 25-years growth challenges.
 
New Delhi D4D Metro Matrix Tic Tac Toe
  140617 India New Delhi D4D Urban Metropolitan Metro-Matrix Propositive
  India is addressing the largest world urban explosion.
Out of the 2 billion new rural emigrants around the world in the next 20 years, 360 million will be Indian. That is a rate of 50.000 every day for the next 20 years.
- How to cope with this? Not by building New Towns (or ‘Smart Cities’). You should address your actual problems instead of declaring yourself incompetent and offering a New Town heaven instead.
- How to address the issue? India has 31 metropolises over 1.5 million inhabitants. These are the ones which, growing fast, confront huge problems proportional to their size. Some of them are growing at 11% rates, most around 5% and 4%. We must understand though that 5% annual growth means 100% in 14 years. Means you are doubling tour size in 14 years. Having to build in 14 years what you had build during millennia.
- How to allocate uses? Where to provide land? How to build infrastructures?

As we have seen with the simplicity of New Delhi structure and needs Metro Matrix provides the response as it has done for many metropolises elsewhere. Applied to the Nation’s capital, New Delhi, as a token of its efficiency, you can analyze the metropolitan structure of the urban expansion and provide for the correct location of urban expansion, natural protection, infrastructure provision and productive allocation.
The Metro-Matrix-token presented, in which New Delhi has a four-corner-post basic structure easy to manage and provide for, should be developed into precise proposals, as should/could be so for the other metropolitan explosive areas in India.
It’s up to Government to show its leadership capacity.
 
On the footsteps of Krishna: Surat, Gujarat
  Surat Gujarat Metropolitan Urban Strategy Plan Metro Matrix
  Surat Metropolis, with 4.5 million inhabitants, is in the Mumbai-Delhi Industrial Corridor. It is the intermediate city between Ahmedabad and Mumbai: a highly strategic location. Surat has already benefited from National Highway (NH-8) investments and historic rail tracks assets. The Ukai Dam and the regulation of Tapi River flow provides as well for an important agricultural potential. Airport facilities, well located, can be expanded to provide the final strategic platform.

Surat has a potential compatible with the inherited metropolitan structure. The north-south coast line and the east-west Tapi River have defined a strong reticular structure. The train tracks follow the reticula and the NH-8 Mumbai-Delhi Highway reinforces the north-south main directionality.

Location of main economic (secondary and tertiary) economic centers automatically derives from the intersection of the main Gray Infrastructure Network. The Tapi and its agricultural plain provide for the backbone of the Green Infrastructure network.

Surat, as one of the Capitals of Krishna’s Kingdom can follow the footsteps of the Gita on the understanding and management of its metropolitan future.
 
Ahmedabad Metropolitan Brainshop
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
  The 5-day Metropolitan Lab on Gujarat’s Sustainable Urbanisation, was launched on March 6th and is applying a new methodology focusing on the integration of metropolitan policies and the consensus of the key metropolitan institutions. It builds on the collaboration of theEuropean Union (EU), UN-Habitat, and several universities. The objective of the Lab, which is based on hands-on projects and teamwork, is to explore in an interactive and comprehensive manner the challenges and opportunities for sustainable urban development in Gujarat with a focus in the Ahmedabad region. A diverse group of participants from AMC, AUDA, MEGA, CEPT, GIFT and other organisations are working in teams, in close cooperation with Mr. P. Ortiz, International Metropolitan Management Expert and a team of specialists, to comprehensively assess the implementation of new projects, in the fields of transportation, environment, housing, land use, etc.
 
European Union and India Agreement institutionalizing Brainshops
  Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Discipline Metro Matrix Brainshop Governance workshop
  Page 5:
"Activities to further develop the pilot Metropolitan Labs, which have been tested in Mumbai and Ahmedabad, with a view to develop a specific curriculum and deliver these Labs in key cities across India to foster good governance and develop urban projects as well as, more generally, activities that promote sustainable human settlement planning and management"
 
Maharashtra Brainshop
  Maharashtra Brainshop Workshop UN-Habitat European Union EU Pedro B. Ortiz Metro-Matrix
  Metropolitan Lab on Maharashtra’s Sustainable Urbanisation, 19-24 September 2016. General Information

The objective of the Lab, which will be a common hands-on project of all the participants, is to explore in an interactive and comprehensive manner the challenges and opportunities for sustainable urban development in Maharashtra, with a focus on the metropolitan region. The Lab is looking for an integrated territorial vision within which relevant spearheading projects could be identified.

This initiative is launched within the framework of the EU-India Mumbai Partnership and is part of the Preparation of an EU-India Sustainable Urbanisation Partnership project of the European Union. The project is implemented by Suez, Acciona and Mumbai First in order to contribute in finding solutions for Mumbai’s urbanisation challenges.

Lab Procedures:
o Hands-on project of all the participants.
o Conceptual discussion on the strategic future of MMR/Mumbai Metropolis in a global context.
o Selection of strategic projects to analyse the procedures and facilitate their implementation.
o Presentations/discussions about key economic, governance, planning, social, environment,
infrastructure, etc. issues.
o Creation of 4-6 interdisciplinary teams that will work on specific themes that could be developed into a project.
o Policy analysis of what is done and what could be done.

Number of participants: 20-30 professionals with a planning, engineering, economics, administrative and other backgrounds from various organisations including MCGM, MMRDA, CIDCO, MbPT, NGOs, advisors, etc.

Coordinator: Mr. Pedro Ortiz, International Metropolitan Management Expert.
Venue address: Board Room, 4th Floor, Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA),
 
Ahmedabad Brainshop Transport
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
2013-2040 India Metropolitan Challenge
  India Metropolitan Challenge Metro Matrix development
  India is expecting 360 million people to move from rural to urban in the next 20 years. That is 50.000 every day and thus the need to accommodate and build 12.000 homes every single day for the next 20 years. Is India doing so? What we are seeing is probably 12.000 new slums every day.

If anyone doubts about those figures look individually to the growth rates of Indian Metropolises: They range from 11% annual to 7%, 5% and the lowest Mumbai 3 %.
11% growth means doubling every 7 years. Pune, such is the case, has to build a new Pune every 7 years. A task the Government is obviously not able to handle. At the lower scale Mumbai, with its 3 % growth rate, requires to be expanded again and again every 23 years; a task beyond the capacity scope of the Government.

And this is a problem that affects more than 50 metropolises in India beyond a million inhabitants: 164 million people in total that will become 400 million in 20 years. A solution is required if social inequity and social unrest is not an acceptable outcome. And the results of it will affect India for many decades (even centuries) to come, as the “vertical” slums of the Industrial Revolution still affect European cities 200 years later.

We want to provide solutions to it. Have a look to “The Art of Shaping the Metropolis” (McGraw Hill, 2013) and you will see the answer.
 
Prof. R. Jha on Mumbai's Governance Component
 
 
Mumbai Metropolitan Challenge, work in progress
  Mumbai metropolitan urban plan cidco development NANAI
  Mumbai is growing. Not in population, only 25% in the next 20 years, but it is growing. Due to the sheer size of Metropolitan Mumbai (23 million inhabitants) any absolute figure is substantial. Has to be dealt correctly. Mumbai explosion is in other metropolitan key elements. Car ownership is likely to grow from 2 million to 20 million units. Air traffic will grow from actual 35 million passengers per year to 150 million. Housing requirements from actual 5 million, in 4 member families, to 10 million in 2.4 member families; that is 200.000 new dwellings every year for 800.000 people.

Mumbai has been doing relatively well. Navi Mumbai in 50 years, since 1966, has replicated the linear peninsula structure of urban Mumbai across the bay: 10 new townships of 100.000 inhabitants, a total of 1 million. Now they need to do that almost every year; to be more precise 4 New Towns of 50.000 dwellings every year.
A Metropolitan/Regional is on the way. We cannot comment as it has not been shared with the population and the document is not public. We are willing to believe that these issues have been addressed correctly.

The operative body to implement territorial development is CIDCO, the one that developed Navi Mumbai these last 50 years. The New Challenge is different. Procedural mechanisms will be different, as landowners will have management initiatives. The development approach will account for existing townships and will not have the New Town approach. The risk is a metastatic urban sprawl with commercial ribbon development strips in the American style: unsustainable and inefficient.

Mumbai, India, has one of the richest urban cultures in the world. The elements are there, embodied in the actual townships. It is just necessary to read them and to produce a multi-scalar system that will articulate the metropolitan scale and the local one in fractal dialogue. This is the first attempt to approach the structural elements of that dialogue. Much work still to be done. This is just work in progress.
 
Ahmedabad Brainshop HST Centrality
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
The New Metropolitan Centrality of AMR
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
  Understanding the Centrality of AMR. The Ahmedabad Metropolitan Region shows a formal reticular structure with grids running from north to south running parallel to the Sabaramati river axis. The city is growing in the western and southern direction (i.e. on the west side of the river) and all the major new residential and commercial developments have come up in this region between the 132 feet ring road, the S.P. Ring road and beyond. On the other hand the Gandhinagar city (administrative capital) and the new large scale commercial developments like GIFT city has been planned on the north eastern part of the city. The existing railway station and international airport are somewhere in the central part of the larger AMR.
 
Prof. Abhay Pethe on Mumbai's Economic Component
 
 
Mumbai criss-cross
  Mumbai Transport Strategic Metropolitan Plan Urban
  India is composed by a series of parallel lines that cross the pyramidal shaped subcontinent from East to West, and a vertical north/south backbone in the center with a set of parallel lines to the coasts. This pattern is more definite in the west coast. Mumbai metropolitan weight distorts the homogenous space patterns and introduces two national diagonals: One in the direction of Nashik and New Delhi, the other in the direction of Pune and Hyderabad. Mumbai bay (which makes of Mumbai’s success as a strategic port) breaks the continuity of the coast structural line and creates an inland centrality for the crossing of the national scale diagonals.

Mumbai built up area is 450 sq. km. Annual growth is 3.05%. That is 14 sq. km: An Area that would cover the entire historical peninsula. To avoid slum generation and serve its population needs Mumbai has to extend its serviced land every year by 14 sq. km. Otherwise the Administration in charge should be accountable for the consequences. Annual needs of Land for Mumbai are 100% in 23 years. That is 14 sq. km. per year.

New land has to be allocated and serviced in metro-matrix integrated location with no disruption to environmental assets, accessible to labor markets for social lower incomes and economically efficient for global competitive locations. Metro Matrix can provide location attending for these 3 aspects. Zooming down into the urban structure we detect two main centralities (Mumbai and Thane) with a third emerging one (Panvel) due to the accessibility provided by the Sion-Panvel three bay bridges. Extensive rail network provides the basis for a metropolitan TOD system of Metro-Matrix development provision
 
Ahmedabad Brainshop Environment
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Mr. Ramana Mumbai's Transport Component
 
 
Ahmedabad Brainshop Housing
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Guwahati Moebius Infinitum
  Guwahati Assam India Metropolitan Urban strategic Metro Matrix Plan
  Partition of India and Pakistan in 1947 brought about some strange results.

Partition on religious grounds created some unreasonable territorial phenomena.
First of all was the creation of a country with two parts 4.000 km away: East and West Pakistan. It could not stand. It didn’t. Bangladesh departed in 1971.
Second, the cornering of India’s province of Assam beyond Bangladesh connected to India’s mainland only by a narrow umbilical cord squeezed between Bangladesh and Bhutan.

The urban strategy of Assam, in addition to reinforce the narrow corridor that links to India and increase the economic liaisons to natural Dhaka, has to be the development of a strong urban centers interactive structure. Inherited rail system helps. Both river sides of the Brahmaputra are provided by rail tracks. Three connections across the river (Tezpur to be completed) allow for a continuous loop with Guwahati, the capital, in the center.

A Moebius Infinitum link would reinforce the development of a complementary urban system integrating both side of the Brahmaputra into a single productive system.
 
Uma Adusumilli Mumbai's Planning Component
 
 
Ahmedabad Brainshop Productive Activities
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Mr. V. Patil on Mumbai's Productive Activities Sector
 
 
Mrs. S. Mahajan on Mumbai's Housing Sector
 
 
Mr. Ortiz: How to build a metropolitan vision for Ahmedabab.
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Mr. Ortiz: How to make the best out of Ahmedabad
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
160920 Mr. Sree Kumar Kumaraswamy on Mumbai’s Transport Sector.
 
 
Pedro B. Ortiz: The Metropolitan Genoma
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Mr. Karamanos: Strategic approach to decision making and Brainshop deliverables
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof. Shivanand Collective Mobility
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Pedro B. Ortiz Project Selection and Deliverables
  Brainshop Metro-matrix Pedro Ortiz Mumbai Strategic metropolitan plan
 
 
Mr. Thakker: Ahmedabad Urban Planning
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof Shivanand Planning BRT System
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Mr. Pathak: Ahmedabad necessary metropolitan dimension
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof Ashwani Kumar Industrial Development
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof. Iyer Ahmedabad Water provision
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof Patel Ahmedabad metropolitan housing
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Prof. Ortiz Strategic Metropolitan Acupuncture Projects
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Pedro B. Ortiz Physical-Metro Integration
  Pedro Ortiz Mumbai acupuncture chart Metro-Matrix Mental Maps
 
 
Ahmedabad Metropolitan Commuter Rail Project
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix
 
 
Mr Gupta Ahmedabad Metro
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Pedro B. Ortiz on Governance and Metro-Metrics
  Pedro B. Ortiz Metro-Matrix historical paradigm shift
 
 
Pedro B. Ortiz on Urban scale and scramble eggs
  Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolises Scramble Eggs Metro-Matrix Planning Plan Urban Territorial
 
 
Pedro B.Ortiz Housing Policy criteria
  Pedro B. Ortiz Metro-Matrix Mumbai Maharashtra Housing
 
 
Mr Phadke New Towns Governance
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Prof. Vishal Dubey on HYDERABAD Metropolitan Plan
  Pedro B. Ortiz Hyderabad Metropolitan Plan
 
 
S. Loose UN-Habitat on Metropolitan Development
  Pedro B. Ortiz Stephanie Loose Un-Habitat Metropolitan Metro-Matrix
 
 
Ahmedabad interscalarity
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Ms. Uma Adusumilli MMRDA Mumbai
  Ahmedabad metro matrix brainshop metropolitan urban strategic plan strucutural
 
 
Environment Team Presentation
  Team
Aditi Shidhore (MMRDA);
Ravinder Dhiman (IITB);
Aniket Bhatkhnade (University of Mumbai);
Leena Vachasiddha (CSIR-NEERI);
Sagar Saraf (MBPT);
Surabhi Mehrotra (IITB)
 
Environment Team Report
  Team
Aditi Shidhore (MMRDA);
Ravinder Dhiman (IITB);
Aniket Bhatkhnade (University of Mumbai);
Leena Vachasiddha (CSIR-NEERI);
Sagar Saraf (MBPT);
Surabhi Mehrotra (IITB)
 
Housing Team Presentation
  Team
M. S. Kubal | MCGM
S.B. Lagwankar |MbPT
Swati Deore Wagh| MIDC
Kaushal Maru| MMRDA
Rashmi Sharma | MU
 
Housing Team Report
  Team
M. S. Kubal | MCGM
S.B. Lagwankar |MbPT
Swati Deore Wagh| MIDC
Kaushal Maru| MMRDA
Rashmi Sharma | MU
 
Land Use Team Presentation
  Team
Owais A. Momin | MIDC
M. Sivashanmugam | CMDA
Sunil Bhat | MCGM
Venkata Sai Krishna | IITB
Prathima Manohar | TUV
 
Land Use Team Report
  Team
Owais A. Momin | MIDCM,
Sivashanmugam | CMDA Sunil Bhat | MCGM Venkata Sai Krishna | IITB Prathima Manohar | TUV
 
Productive Activities Team Presentation
  Team:
Bhakti Chitale, MMRDA
Ashok Rupwate, MCGM
Devendra Mokal, CIDCO
Ashutosh Pachpute, MIDC
Sulakshana Mahajan, MTSU
 
Productive Activities Team Report
  Team:
Bhakti Chitale, MMRDA
Ashok Rupwate, MCGM
Devendra Mokal, CIDCO
Ashutosh Pachpute, MIDC
Sulakshana Mahajan, MTSU
 
Transport Team presentation
  Team:
Harshal Baviskar @ MMRDA
Manoj Jeurkar @ MCGM
Nimisha Golatkar @ CIDCO
Shubhangi Kale @ CIDCO
Surbhi Mehrotra @ IIT.B
 
Transport Team report
  Team:
Harshal Baviskar @ MMRDA
Manoj Jeurkar @ MCGM
Nimisha Golatkar @ CIDCO
Shubhangi Kale @ CIDCO
Surbhi Mehrotra @ IIT.B
 
Synthesis of Team proposals. Work in Progress
  Pedro B. Ortiz Maharashtra Brainshop Mumbai
 
 
Piero Remitti European Urban Policy in India
  Ahmedabad Brainshop Pedro B. Ortiz Metropolitan Strategic Metro Matrix